Nong Khiaw (Mar 8-10): A Quiet Mountain Town and Phadeng Peak

The trip to Nong Khiaw was the squishiest ride that I’ve been on so far. I booked my ticket from my hostel in Luang Prabang, and it cost 85000 kip ($13.69AUD). I was told that it would come at 8:30, but it showed up ten minutes early and I joined an older couple in the back of a tuktuk. I thought, “This will be nice! There’s only three of us.” But then, the driver stopped at another place and picked up one more person, and then another place and picked up one more person, and then continued stopping until there were about ten of us packed in. All of our luggage was professionally stacked in the middle, as if the driver had done this a million times.

I could hardly see the people across from me because the luggage was stacked so high. About a half hour later, we stopped at the van, where we all had to get out of the tuktuk, grab our things to put in the van, and get in. This was the disadvantage of being one of the first ones picked up – I was one of the last ones off of the tuk tuk, and the last one to enter the van so I was forced to the middle seat in the back, sandwiched between a random guy and the huge stack of luggage, some of which was taking up half of my seat space. My only two options were to 1) squish behind the big bulge coming into my seat, or 2) rest my head on the bag and use it as a pillow. Within the first five minutes of us moving, I suddenly remembered my motion sickness pills. I guess I forgot to take them 30 minutes beforehand, and they COULD end up making me feel drowsy, but I wasn’t going to take any chances this time. I’d rather face drowsiness than one or two days of feeling sick. It wasn’t a hugely swerve-y ride, but it was definitely a bumpy ride!! Many times, I couldn’t help bouncing into the guy right beside me. Luckily, the ride wasn’t too long and we arrived about three hours later, right at noon. Nong Khiaw is a not-so-secret mountain village, and it’s absolutely breathtaking with the surrounding mountains.

There weren’t any hostels advertised online, so I had to book my own room in a guesthouse, called Meexai Guesthouse, for a whopping 129000 kip per night ($20.77). However, it WAS nice to have my own room and bathroom for more than one night, especially with a king-sized bed (starfish position all night!). I checked in and oddly enough, they didn’t ask for any payment and said I’d pay at check out, which was very trusting of them. I got settled and then decided to go have lunch. I went to a restaurant closeby called Noymany Restaurant, which was known for a nice patio but slow service. I prepared myself and asked for the wifi password, but they didn’t have wifi (as well as many of the other restaurants in this town). Laos is the only country that I didn’t get a SIM card – not because it was expensive, but because I was only in Laos for a week and figured I wouldn’t need it. However, it made me realise how useful it was to have a SIM card because often when I’m on my bus or waiting for a train, I can research places to stay and things to do in the area that I’m going to. Since I wasn’t able to do that, I found myself wasting time at my accommodation because I’d spend my time researching stuff there instead of going out and doing what I had planned. I had actually planned most of this trip over a year ago, back when I was stuck doing my farmwork in Australia and had nothing else to do. I read blogs, looked at Pinterest, researched travel itineraries, and planned out my route. And I typed out a 6.5-page document to guide me through my trip. When I first started my trip, I ignored the guide and did what I wanted instead, but then when I looked at the guide later, I realised that all of the things that I ended up doing were on the list anyway. Obviously, no one knows myself like I do, so I’m very thankful that my past self prepared this document for my present self! In the document, all I wrote for Nong Khiaw was to do the 100 Waterfalls Trek. It’s supposed to be one of the best hikes to do, and has even been featured on a television show (which is why Nong Khiaw has now gained so much popularity). However, I didn’t realise that I’d have to pay to take a guide on this hike. And the cheapest amount that I heard of was 180000 kip ($30)! I’ve never paid this much to do a hike, and wasn’t really feeling like paying my entire daily budget to do it. I hummed and hawed for awhile, and eventually decided against taking the hike. It’s probably for the best because that day, I ended up getting sick. Again. At the restaurant, I ordered a green curry soup and an iced coffee for 33000 kip ($5.31).

However, I’ve noticed that ever since I reached northern Thailand (and Laos), my stomach has been a lot more sensitive to the foods. This has led me to believe that they must use MSG (monosodium glutamate, or E621 for all of you European folk) in their foods, which I react to quite badly. I was also suspicious about this when I was reading reviews about another restaurant in the area, and many of the reviews said that the other restaurant didn’t use MSG. So I figured other restaurants MUST be using MSG. Either that, or I reacted to the condensed milk that they put in their coffee, which makes it beyond sweet. Anyway, I did a brief walk around the town but then ended up spending the rest of the afternoon in my room until I started feeling better again, which wasn’t until later in the evening, when I had dinner.

I decided to go to an Indian restaurant this time (which can also be hit or miss with my stomach) and went to Deen Restaurant, where I ordered a chicken korma and chai latte for 46000 kip ($7.41).

It was absolutely delicious (and so I happily returned there the next evening!). I didn’t get back to my room until about 9pm and when I did, I was really struggling with opening my door. There were two German guys sitting on their patio two doors down, so one came over to help and couldn’t open it either. Then the other one came and finally got it open, but I didn’t even end up going in because we stayed out and chatted until about midnight. They were on a 3-week vacation and had just come from Vietnam (so they were doing the opposite route to me), and they were both really down-to-earth, nice guys. It’s always those people who I really get along with (such as Paulina in Chiang Rai) who I never end up exchanging information with, or even get a name in this case. But I enjoyed our three hours of conversation!

On Saturday morning, I decided to do the viewpoint hike, which climbs to the top of Phadeng Peak. First, I went for breakfast at a nearby restaurant called Alex Restaurant and got the Farmer Breakfast, which was by far the tastiest meal I had in Laos!

The meal came with an omelette (which was amazing and was made with dill, among other things, but why have I never put dill in my omelette before?! It takes it to the next level for sure!), cooked squash, kaipen (crispy riverweed, which is like seaweed but without the fishy taste – it was so good!), and sticky rice with a delicious eggplant dip. It was so much food, but I ended up eating it all because it was so amazing! Not only that, but with the coffee, they gave condensed milk AND actual milk so that I had the choice. All of that for 33000 kip ($5.31)! After breakfast, I headed back to my room to get everything ready for my walk, and then set off to the entry point. I had to pay 20000 kip ($3.22) to enter, and was greeted by a sign that said I had to worry about something OTHER than snakes and other creatures – unexploded bombs that were still in the area, because Nong Khiaw was one of the most bombed areas in Laos in the 60s by the US.

I was told that it would take at least one hour to go up and then about 45 minutes back down. I decided to wear my compression bands for my knees and I’m so glad I did! It was a constant uphill battle for the majority of the hike. I was going higher and higher and was already out of breath when I came to a rest area with benches and swings, where two British girls were taking a rest. I checked my watch and it had only been 8 minutes… I was doomed. I chatted with the two girls for awhile and then continued on my way. I took multiple breaks and was so thankful that I brought two water bottles because I was nearly done the first one after I had reached the halfway point. After about 40 minutes, I finally got out of the heat and reached a rainforest-like area, which was considerably cooler (yet still not quite cool enough!). I reached the top after about an hour and ten minutes, and I spent at least an hour up there. When I checked my phone, it said that I had climbed 130 flights of stairs – the most I’ve ever done on this trip! No wonder I was so tired… It was surprisingly busy when I first arrived, with about 10-15 people at the top, but once everyone got their selfies and left, I got to enjoy the whole place by myself. The haze had already started to settle in, so it wasn’t a completely clear view but it was still really nice!

I made my way back down and caught up with Hannah and Robyn, who had already started heading back so I walked the rest of the way down with them. They were both planning to move to Australia after their Asia travels (as many travellers here do), and one of the girls did her farmwork and stayed in the same hostel as me when I was in Mildura – such a small world! By the time we got back to the bottom, my legs were feeling like jelly so I went back to my room (they had to catch the bus to their next destination) and showered. I then went to a restaurant to enjoy a banana smoothie with the sunset and as I was leaving, two other girls (a German and French girl) were leaving and invited me to join them for dinner.

They were going to the same Indian restaurant that I had went to the night before (which I was fine with) so I ordered some chicken tikka masala with naan.

I had been looking forward to having dessert this time because they had gulab jamun on their menu – one of my favourite things, which I haven’t actually noticed on any other Indian menus during my travels. Unfortunately, they were out of them so I STILL didn’t get to have any. Maybe next time… One of the girls said that she had done the 100 Waterfalls Hike and because it was dry season, there wasn’t much of a waterfall. She said that it wasn’t really worth paying for, so I didn’t need to have any regrets about not doing it! I had to catch my bus at 8am the next morning, so I went back to my room to organise my things and go to bed so I could get up early enough to have breakfast before starting the extremely long journey into Vietnam. Love always

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s